Home
Loading
  Contact Us    
Including the Kitchen Sink

Milosevic has only 150 days to present his case.

by Barnabas
July 7, 2004

Bookmark and Share


The prosecution, which wrapped up its case in February after testimony from nearly 300 witnesses,  has tried to link Milosevic directly to the wars in the Balkans in the 1990s that left more than 200,000 people dead.
     Milosevic... has demanded that former U.S. President Bill Clinton and over 1,600 others appear as defense witnesses, but Milosevic has only 150 days to present his case. –CNN.com, July 5

All experts in the legal profession, including those trained by CourtTV, are welcome to stop reading. It will be clear on their terms that I don’t know what I am talking about. Fortunately, I write this column on my terms, at least insofar as the editor will post it. As Barnabas, I don’t pretend to be an expert on anything; I leave that to my real job. 

I do claim, however, to be the voice of common sense; and from that perspective very long trials are absurd, no matter what the legal arguments are for them. Juries, judges, and panels can only pretend to process the information that surfaces (or is more likely buried in thousands of pages) in a trial that lasts months or years. It makes the legal profession and system appear to be the most undisciplined in the world;  most of us work under realistic time restraints.

I picked up on this trial as I was scanning the headlines, not because I know much about the Balkans but because I was amazed to see that the trial was still on.  One word caused me to halt as I scanned the story. What do they mean, "only 150 days to present his case"?

To argue that justice requires lengthy process is nonsense, since justice rarely appears to be the primary goal of most prosecutions and defenses. Neither side wants perfect justice, because perfect justice almost always makes demands on everyone. What is desired on both sides is an imperfect justice that damages the opposition to the fullest possible extent. To the lay spectator most trial time  is given to obscuring facts if  they are against you, and enlarging them if they support you. The old saying goes, "everything but the kitchen sink" but the current process includes the kitchen sink.

(0 Comments)
Post a Comment

Send Us Your Opinion
(Comments are moderated.)
Your Name:*


Your E-Mail Address:*
(Confidential. Will not be published.)


Location:


Comments:*
Note: In order to control automated spam submissions, URLs are no longer permitted in this form.



Verification:
Please type the letters you see above.

  Printer-Friendly

Bookmark and Share


EMAIL ALERTS
Sign up to receive an e-mail notice when new articles by this author are published. Your address remains confidential, and you may cancel at any time. A confirmation email will be sent.

Your e-mail address:
Including the Kitchen Sink
po Books
Now Available!

Teachings of a Three Year Old... Turned Tyke,
by Hal Evan Caplan.

A father learns from the wisdom of his toddler.

More Information.

More by Barnabas
Barnabas Says Goodbye
Moving on, not moving out.
by Barnabas, 1/19/05
Seats on the Fifty-Yard Line
Yet another American value.
by Barnabas, 1/12/05
Ethical Endgame
When children become sexual slaves.
by Barnabas, 12/15/04
Eighteen Years on Death Row
We have redefined 'speedy trial' and 'cruel and unusual.'
by Barnabas, 12/8/04
Hard on Drugs, Soft in the Head
Legalizing marijuana.
by Barnabas, 12/1/04
Wesley and Wal-Mart
Destructive competition as a stinky enterprise.
by Barnabas, 11/24/04
The Mandate to Govern
Third party time.
by Barnabas, 11/17/04
» Complete List (137)


Recently Published
View Article Salvator Mundi
Not the painting but the Person
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 12/7/17
When the Newsman Becomes News
Lamenting yet another fallen hero
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 12/1/17
Let's Hear It for Moms and Pops
Celebrating Small Business Saturday in a very personal way
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 11/22/17
An Earthquake in La La Land
Examining what's been exposed in the rubble
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 11/17/17
Where is God?
Reflecting on the tragedy in a little Texas town
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 11/10/17
An All Saints Day Tribute
Remembering those who left us
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 11/3/17
A Mighty Fortress was His God
Remembering the legacy of Martin Luther 500 years later
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 10/27/17

Get the Partial Observer's
'recently published' headlines via RSS.


RSS Feed for Recently Published PO Articles    What is RSS?

Reproduction of original material from The Partial Observer without written permission is strictly prohibited.
The opinions expressed by site contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the editors.
Copyright ©2000-2017 partialobserver.com. All rights reserved.
Home · Site Map · Top